Module 3 Chapter 6

Simple Tassels

Well, this chapter was an indulgence!  I love making tassels, and hadn’t done any for a while.  There are only two images for this chapter, showing six tassels each.

1.

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From left to right: tassel made of strips of paper raffia, bound at the neck with silver lurex thread; a more modest sample made from variegated pearl cotton bound with lurex pearl cotton at the neck; tassel made from strips of dyed cotton fabric bound with pearl cotton; tassel with a plaited head – made by plaiting the centre section of a bundle of stranded cottons, then bending the bundle in half and making the neck with pearl cotton; a double-decker rosette tassels made by wrapping variegated cotton around a rectangular frame and stitching along the centre, then folding the strip and rolling it around a twisted cord; (this one’s hard to see) a more traditional tassel made from lurex knitting yarn with a pearl cotton neck and the head decorated with a mesh hood in buttonhole stitch using the same pearl cotton.

2.

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Some more baroque examples.  From left: a machine-made tassel using lurex knitting yarn for the skirt, with the head machine-stitched in shiny rayon machine thread to match the neck, suspended from a twisted cord; another machine-made tassel using silk string and silk ribbon for the skirt and lurex machine thread for the head; strips of dyed silk and shorter strips of crystal organza for the skirt with a beaded crystal necklace – for this one, I layered two strips of fabric, machined down the centre, then folded the piece of fabric in half lengthways, cut the ‘fringe’, and gathered the machine stitching then rolled it up.  The next one is made from purple stranded cotton with contrasting gimp wound over it, then having bound the neck, I tied knots in the gimp.  This one looks like neon tubing.  The next one is more simple, made from assorted lurex threads with a twisted cord as the head.  The last one is made from rat-tail braid and lurex knitting yarn with a contrasting neck, then a beaded overskirt added for fun.

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